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1925 






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PAGE SIX 



tIFlje Reamer 



FOREWORD 

The work of producing this book has been 
hindered by many obstacles, the limited time 
being the greatest. The biography section fol- 
lowing represents many hours of work, particular 
attention being given to the elimination of 
remarks which might hurt a sensitive nature. 

No attempt has been made to reduce the 
individual thesies to a set style, but after read- 
ing them you will be convinced that measures 
have been taken to prevent undue criticism or 
praise. 

A flattering write-up often suggests sarcasm, 
while one revealing petty shortcoming, and 
satirizing a man's mistakes is a positive indica- 
tion that he is well liked by his classmates. 

The publication of this book was made 
possible by the advertisers and contributors, so 
devote as much time to the reading of the last 
few pages as you do the first. Patronize them 
when you have the chance. 



PAGE SEVEN 



tE^e ^tnmtt 



Textile education in the United States dates back 
comparatively few years, but in this short time the 
worth of the instruction given by these schools has 
been shown. It was at first thought that this field 
could not be entered through the doors of any educa- 
tional institution, but that one had to approach by 
means of the mill only. Today this has been changed 
through the establishment of textile schools which 
offer an intensive training in the manufacturing, 
dyeing and finishing of textile fabrics. 

Many people have the impression that only theory 
is taught at a textile school but the time in school is 
equally divided between the classroom and the 
machine room. The students run all the machines, 
pull them down and assemble them again, and make 
all the settings. In the dyeing department the students 
dye, finish and mercerize the cloth in their own dye 
house with standard equipment. 

By combining theory and practical work the 
student receives a training that should make him 
competent enough to enter any field of the textile 
industry. He should however, at the start not ex- 
pect high positions but be contented with an oppor- 
tunity to advance on his merits. 



PAGE EIGHT 



®fj£ Reamer 



THE BEAMER 



STAFF 



Editor in Chief 
A. Einwood Brassell 



Business Manager 
James McArdle 



Faculty Advisor 
Edward V. Carroll, B. S. 



Advertising 

James E. Giblin, Manager 

Charles Eubinsky, Assistant 



Jokes 
Francis X. Campion 



Sports 
William Cromie 



Associate Editor 

Bernard Golding 

Eugene Flanagan, Assistant 

Contributors 

Robert Cooper '25 Gordon Andrew '25 

Sherman Monroe '25 Thomas Gracia '26 

Kenneth Crowley '25 Alvin Hoar '25 



PAGE NINE 



^e Reamer 




A. LINWOOD BRASSKIyL 

Taunton High General Cotton 

"Brassie" " Linny" 

Vice President Phi Psi 3 Student Advisor 3 

Class Ring Committee 3 



Chairman Social Committee 2 
Social Committee 3 
Member Advisory Board 3 

* ' Le Cercle Francaise ' ' 



Editor in Chief of Year Book 
Glee Club 3 



Here is the "Big Chief" himself, with all the grace and poise 
of a stern editor. And just think, he comes from Taunton; but 
remember, good things come from small places. Wherever there 
are activities, you'll always find "Linny." He never misses a 
ball game — Who threw that? Wherever you see k 'L,inny," you'll 
always see his shadow in the person of "Gibby." They stick 
together like honey-suckle to a front porch. 

He knows so much about carding, he thinks a second hand 
in a card room is a dealer in antiques; but nevertheless, "Iyinny" 
knows his stuff and craves engineering problems. Good luck, 
Chief, with your cheerful happy smile ; success and good fortune 
will never be far from you. 



PAGE TEN 



%{\t y&tixmtt 




FRANCIS X. CAMPION 



St. Mary's High 

"Campy" " Franky" ' 

Secretary Phi Psi 3 
Member Advisory Board 2 
Baseball 1, 2, 3, Captain 2 
"lye Cercle Francaise" 

Joke Editor of Year Book 



General Cotton 

"Tight" 

Student Advisor 2 
Glee Club 3 
Basketball 1, 2 
Social Committee 3 



Where this gentleman comes from, nobody knows. Some say 
that he comes from Borneo, others accuse him of being a resident 
of Taunton. Nevertheless, he is a wild, wild man in school, and 
with the ladies. 

He is a most mysterious person, being conspicuous because of 
the fact that he hibernates during the summer and winter months 
under a dense growth of silky beard. 

Much to Barney's distress, he possesses a remarkable ability 
to accept "invitations" to partake of sumptuous repasts at the 
Eagle or at Sokoll's. 

Frank produces many thrills for the teachers. Among them 
may be mentioned his reluctance to assume his usual sitting 
position in the Card Room after his first few riding lessons. 

Camp was on the baseball team but he 4k ain't no more." 

In the near future we will hear of his great accomplishments 
in the Textile World; at least we have hopes. 



PAGE ELEVEN 



'(Jjje ^tnmzt 




ROBERT E. COOPER 
U. S. Army Officer's Training School 

' ' Squire " " Simon Legree ' ' 

President Phi Psi 3 

Wrestling 

Social Committee 2 



General Cotton 

"Bob" 

Glee Club 3 
Class Orator 



Here we have him ! The successor to "Big Munn." Bob's 
great hobby is wrestling; if you don't think so, then try to talk or 
rather argue with him concerning the science of rolling and tumbling 
on a mat. 

Aside from wrestling, Bob enjoys greatly a hearty laugh. 
Many a dull class-room has been brought up to the highest pitch 
of merriment as a result of Bob infecting the rest of the " gang ' 
with his unrestrained mirth. 

I" his three years at B. D. T. S., Bob has been a very good 

student. His standing can be well judged from the fact that he 

was the recipient of a scholarship during his last two years of 

^tudy. It is very evident that he feels right at home in a card 

working on such mysteries as differential and builder motions. 

v u :- < v jr Bob has in mind as his future work, which no doubt 
will be • extile nature, we feel certain that, as for being success- 
ful, he wlI rate ace-high. 

Best wishes and lots of luck, Bob. 



PAGE TWELVE 



®*J. 



earner 




JAMES Iv. GIBLIN 

B. M. C. Durfee High School General Cotton 

' ' Pete " " Gibby " " Shadow ' ' 

Phi Psi Social Committee 2, 3 

Ring Committee 3 Glee Clnb 3 

Baseball 2 " Le Cercle Francaise ' ' 

Advertising Manager of Year Book 

Three years ago "Gibby" bowed his head and entered the 
portals of dear old Durfee. Every ounce of this stately individual 
is true blue, and he is as popular with the boys as a hot cross bun 
on Good Friday. 

He li ails from the "Hilltop," an easy-going, dependable chap, 
ever ready to help and give advice to a less fortunate brother. 
When it comes to a question of eats, we can always depend c "ii:i; 
to find the caterer. Remember our " Frat " banquet, boys? 

During his last year at school, "Gibby" has been very active. 
As a member of the social committee, he has been one of h ' 
mainstays in making our dances successful, and was a mem' j*. 
the year book staff. 

His pleasant disposition and marked ability assure us that 
"Gibby" will not fail in anything he may undertake in the future. 
Best of wishes, "Pete." 



PAGE Th,a i ti£N 



®lj£ Reamer 




D. BERNARD GOLDING 



Columbia University 

"Googles" "Squeak" 
Sigma Phi Tau 
Counsilor 
President A. A. 3 
Secretary A. A. 2 
Social Committee 2, 3 



General Cotton 
' ' Croesus ' ' 



Barnyard" 

Glee Club 3 

Ring Committee 3 

Associate Editor 3 

Member of Advisory Board 2, 3 

(Father of His Class) 



Three years ago Columbia bade farewell to a son of old New 
York and sent the amiable personage of D. Bernard Golding to us. 
"Croesus" sure is a good scout, and sure has been "The Friend 
Indeed" to more than one of the boys. He is a natural born 
banker, and we don't mean "maybe." They say that Barney 
opened his pocket-book one day, and out came a moth which bit 
him. He sure does love athletics, and his old familiar "Come on, 
Gents — get in there and fight," will long be remembered. 

When it comes to putting over school dances, we all take our 
hats off to Barney. Barney is always lucky, and we hear that 
soon after he leaves us he will become superintendent of "Dad's" 
finishing plant in Southbridge. 

Good luck, Barney, old boy, you've earned it. 



PAGE FOURTEEN 



®{je Reamer 




CHARGES LUBINSKY 

B. M. C. Durfee High School General Cotton 

" Toots" xi Sharlie" 

Treasurer Sigma Phi Tau Orchestra 

Social Committee 2 Glee Club 3 

Assistant Advertising Manager of Year Book 

"He dares do all that may become a man 
Who dares do more is none." 



"Toots" is our carefree, ever-smiling Beau Brummel, ana 
ever predominant where can be found a bevy of beautiful women. 
They tell us "Sharlie" had a wonderful trip to Philadelphia, 
especially on the boat. 

He is noted for his wrestling and boxing ability. "Big Munn " 
Cooper will blushingly vouch for that! "Sharlie" stages a bout 
every noon, and there are rumors around that Ringling Brothers 
intend to s ; gn him up in a sideshow with a guarantee of $5.00 for 
any spider that will last three minutes with this flash. 

"Sharlie" is a mean stepper, and it is said that he will soon 
take one of his dancing partners into a partnership for life. 



PAGE FIFTEEN 



®{j£ Reamer 




GKORGE Iv. MILLS 
Pavvtucket High School 

' ' Goosey ' ' 

Phi Psi 



"Larry" 
Social Committee 2 



General Cotton 



Glee Club 3 



"Goosey" came to us three years ago from Pawtucket High 
and a more likeable chap never settled among us. But the old boy 
has been in tough luck; he has literally had more "ups and downs" 
than a rubber ball. But "Larry" is no quitter, and managed to 
weather the raging tempest, and has east anchor in the quiet 
harbor of success. George is the proud possessor of a scholarship, 
and we all admit that he rightly deserves it. 

"Larry" claims the services of an interpreter in the person of 
the "Squire," who translates any "wise" remarks that may be 
made among the boys. He is a retiring chap, and seems completely 
unaware of the existence of the fair sex. 

Luck to you, "Goosey". 



PAGE SIXTEEN 



^H]t Reamer 




GEORGE SHERMAN MONROE 

Middleboro High School General Cotton 

"General" " Whizzy" 

Phi Psi Social Committee 2 

Glee Club 3 Wrestling 

"The sun rose and set upon his nose." 

"General" is one of these gentlemen who say little but 
accomplish much. Like all the members of the cotton class, he is 
all wrapped up in his studies, and according to his instructors, 
turns out some excellent work. His classmates say he has a 
weakness for weaving and Mr. Norman. 

We are told that he has changed since graduating from 
Middleboro High, where he is said to have been somewhat girl-shy. 
He is now a thirty-seventh degree member of the local order of 
Shieks. 

Much excitement has at times been created in the class room 
.as a result of one of " Whizzy's" frequent outbursts. 

Well, ik General," all we ask is that we hear as much of you 
when you are out in the wide world as we have while you were 
with us at B. D. T. S. 

Here's luck, Sherman. 



PAGE SEVENTEEN 



'(Elje Reamer 




HAROLD DEAN 



Middleboro High 

" Tricky" 

Phi Psi 

Baseball Captain 2 



Designing 

Big Dean ' ' 

Glee Club 2 
Baseball 1, 2 



Harold came to us from Middleboro, and was a welcome 
addition to B. D. T. S. He is always ready for either work or 
play, and does both with a winning smile. Baseball fans at Textile 
will always recall the sterling pitching ability of Harold, for he 
has been our mainstay thru two happy years. 

Harold's greatest failing is his irresistible desire to imitate the 
famous Ralph de Palma, and one or more of the boys will vouch 
for Harold's ability to hold the wheel under the most trying 
conditions. 

Well Harry, best of luck, but here's a left earful. Give up 
tne idea of becoming a racing driver. 



PAGE EIGHTEEN 



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GORDON P. ANDREW 
Cranston High Chemistry 

"Andy" " Big Town" 

Phi Psi Treasurer 2 Baseball 2 

i Manager Basketball 1 Glee Club 2 

"Andy" came to Textile from Cranston. With his cheery 
smile and laughing eyes he served his two years, never shirking 
his work, and ever ready to help us all. He has been the hustling 
treasurer of the Phi Psi Fraternity for the past year, and he is 
tighter than a rivet on a boiler when it comes to handing out 
money. Try and get it. 

North Park is his favorite haunt. He and "Big Bad Bill" 
have spent many a glorious night there, studying the milky way, 
the big dipper, and other ^astronomical phenomena. 

You will soon be out in the cruel world, "Andy" and when 
times seem hard, recall the happy days in the " L,ab." \s for 
your future, we venture to say that the symbol "Mg" which vou 
learned at B. D. T. S will describe it. (Make Good.) 



PAGE NINETEEN 



till}* ^J 



t&xatx 




WILIvIAM O. CROMIE 
Searles High School Chemistry 

"Arsenic" "Bill" 

Phi Psi Basketball 1 

B. B. Club Captain 2 

"Big, bad, bold, Bill" is '-'Sweet William" now. He hails 
from Great Barrington and was graduated from Searles High 
School in the class of '23. Now he leaves Textile as one of her 
best athletes and captain of one of the best basketball teams the 
school has ever produced. 

"Bill's" first appearance would remind one of an innocent 
"babe." His magnetic personality accounts for his popularity 
with the fair sex and he leaves a long string of broken hearts 
among Fall River's fair ones. 

" Bill's" favorite song: "I wonder what's become of Sally." 

We can truthfully say that the "Swede" has given the best 
that is in him (what he did not give, we took). We predict that 
he will attain his share of success in life, altho we warn him to 
beware of the weaker sex. 

"The evil that men do, lives after them. 
The good is oft interr'd with their bones." 



PAGE TWENTY 



©fye Reamer 




KENNETH CROWLEY 

B. M. C. Durfee High School Chemistry 

"Ken" "Mr." 

Phi Psi Glee Club 2 

Basketball 1 

Quiet and unassuming of manner. " Ken " has demonstrated 
his ability by the way in which he has taken part in all school 
affairs. His athletic build, wavy hair, and winning smile account 
for his many feminine acquaintances. 

"Durfee High School lost him through graduation, Durfee 
Textile found him through the untiring efforts of the "Steep Brook 
Gazette," and now we lose him to the cruel world. 

"Ken'' is a first class basketball player. During his first 
year at Textile, he was one of the mainstays of the hoop aggrega- 
tion. In his last year it was impossible for him to play as he 
^became "Mr. Crowley," assistant instructor of chemistry in the 
evening classes. 

Here's to your luck and success "Ken" and we hope that 
someday we will hear of you as Professor Crowley. 



PAGE TWENTY ONE 



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AIvVARIS DREW 

Middleboro High School 

" Drury" 

Phi Psi 

B. B. Club 



Chemistry 
Al" 
Glee Club 2 



Middleboro gave us this Little Lord Faimtleroy, but looks are 
often deceiving. "Al" is a great favorite in his class and one of 
its most brilliant members. He has the unusual record of always 
turning in a full set of laboratory equipment at the end of the year 
with some to spare. 

"Al" ieels the effects of his bump last fall, being a little hard 
of hearing except when you ask him whether he wishes that 
quarter you borrowed from him last week. "Al" is a great kid 
and is ever smiling and full of action. 

Best of luck "Al." 



PAGE TWENY-TWO 



®lj£ peamer 




EUGENE JAMES FLANAGAN 

St. Mary's High, Taunton Chemistry 

"Red" "Gene" "Ponk" 

Phi Psi B. B. Club 

Associate Editor of Year Book 

Will any of us forget ' ' Red's ' ' first appearance in the ' ' Chem ' ' 
Class? He came with the reputation of being a prize fighter and 
we must admit that he can " step " when anyone gives him a poke. 
His innocence was refreshing and his blank looks at some of the 
worldly expressions were amusing. 

At times he has been known as '"father" and he certainly 
lived up to his name in the little affair with " Junior." 

His outbursts were frequent and in the "lab," "cut it out 
Flanagan," was a familiar saying. But as he says, "the innocent 
shall suffer." His presence in the "Lab" when the water was 
thrown out the window has never been satisfactorily explained but 
we who know him best, would never connect him with anything of 
the sort. His love for the "stirring rod" is remarkable. 

" Red " is a good student and we hope to hear of his promotion 
to head Chemist, of a well known firm, in the near future. Here's 
to your good luck "Gene," go to it, we're all with you. 



PAGE TWENTY-THREE 



(Elje Reamer 




AIvVIN HOAR 

B. M. C. Durfee High Chemistry 

" AV "Small Town" 

Phi Psi Baseball 1, 2 

Assistant Manager Baseball 2 

Come forward, ladies and gentlemen, and gaze upon the sheik. 
When it comes to women, page "Al". He knows more about the 
girls than old Solomon. "Small Town" has broken more hearts 
and flattened more feet from the much heralded ' ' Walk Back ' ' than 
any cowboy on Bank Street; and when it comes to dancing, Wow! 
that's where this Loving Sam "struts his stuff." He shakes a 
mean pair of dogs. But never-the-less, " Al" is a good scout, and 
you can't help but seek his friendship. He is one of our pitching 
aces and has thus far turned in some sweet performances for the 
team. 

Well, "Al," good luck in New York. Beware! of the wicked 
city. 



PAGE TWENTY-FOUR 



tllfjE ^tnmtx 




HAROLD GARRET KERESY 

Gardner High Chemistry 

"Pitu"- 

Phi Psi Basketball 1 

B. B. Club Manager Baseball 2 

Baseball 1, 2 

The woman hater; he can't bear to look at them (from a 
distance). He likes to get closer. Harold is a very studious lad 
and when it comes to Chemistry, he knows his stuff. Ask where 
Pitu is, and you will always be told that he's up in his room. 

He certainly has stuck to his school work, (there's no getting 
away from it ;) nevertheless he is a four letter man. He received 
one in baseball and three from home. Pitu played ball both years 
and also served as manager for the season of 1925. He certainly 
did dig up a card full of games for this season. Everybody thought 
sure Yale was on the list and it would have been too but for the 
'fact that Yale wouldn't play Pitu's team. 

We are certain that Pitu will be well versed in Chem. and 
Lab. work when he graduates and predict that he will hold down 
many a good position. 



PAGE TWENTY-FIVE 



tElje ^amw 




JAMES McARDLK 

Millbury High School Chemistry 

"Jake" , "Mac" 

Phi Fsi Track Team Basketball 1, 2 

Business Manager of Year Book 

"Mac" is the original gloom chaser of those famous senior 
chemists which means a great deal, for it certainly takes a merry 
lad to live through the bitter battles on the third floor. 

"Jake" still remembers the Union Hospital for a sweet young 
miss from there now considers his Tuesday's and Thursday's as 
all her own. 

"Jake" is a runner of no mean ability and also plays a fine 
game of basketball. He was a great asset to our scrappy aggre- 
gation of '25. 

Keep going "Mac" until you have attained the highest rung 
of the ladder of success. 



PAGE TWENTY-SIX 



ffifye garner 



^tst0rg $i t\]t (Ela£0, 1925 



Three years ago our class came into existence, brim full of 
ideas to revolutionize the textile industry. Our alma mater 
received the most spirited bunch of fellows that she had ever had. 
Alas! we were soon brought down to earth; we began to realize 
that everything was not peaches and cream. In less than a fort- 
night each and everyone of us had voluntarily come to the conclu- 
sion that we knew but one thing ; — that we knew nothing. 

The first year was not as eventful as the next two, altho we 
were enlightened upon many subjects. Barney found out what the 
teacher meant by a monkey wrench. L,inny learned that " Saco 
Pettee " was a machine builder, not a boxer. Gibbie was informed 
that we had a mule in school, and being good hearted brought 
some Shredded Wheat for it. To his surprise he found that the 
mule thrived on cotton. Bob, being a natural born chemist, tried 
to burn h 2 o with his bunsen burner. 

Much to our regret, John Ktheridge, William Bradly, John 
Wade and Foster Broadhurst left our class for other fields. 

In the course of events during the second year, the dyeing 
laboratory was the Mecca of the jokesters. One day Bob put a 
woolen skein in an indigo bath and carefully mixed and stirred it. 
The bath was slowly heated up to (and beyond) the necessary 
temperature. When the dyer went to lift the skein from the bath, 
an oath escaped from his lips. The skein had disappeared. 
Moral : Watch your temperature. 

Barney inaugurated the spirit of haste and actually did two 
experiments while the rest of the class were reading the first. 
Barney Oldfield was the fastest man in Auto racing and Barney 
Golding held the speed honors in chem. lab. The faculty con- 
sidered cutting the corners off the sinks because Barney lost time 
In getting around them. Sherman was going along like a whirl- 
wind until he got 75 in designing, It broke his heart, because 
Barney was after him like a tin can tied to a dog's tail. Yes, the 



PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN 



Sllje ^Seamer 



"General" is so busy watching Barney, to see that he doesn't 
step on his heels, that he can't see where he is going. He was 
invited to a fraternity smoker and was about to decline the invita- 
tion with the excuse that he didn't smoke. However, he went 
and got a cigar. Someone heard that he gave it to his father. 

During the third year there was a little contest to see who 
could cut the most cards for his Jacquard pattern. "Campy" 
won without much competition as he was quite used to cutting 
cards. (Pass the pack to him and see. ) In the cotton stapling 
class, Monroe asked if staple was a kind of wire. He was 
thoroughly enlightened. 

With the year drawing to a close, everyone is looking forward 
to graduation. The members of the class expect to enter mills as 
superintendents, overseers, agents, etc., very soon. 

On the whole the G. C. C. of '25 has had a good scholastic 
standing. 

Before closing, the members of the General Cotton Manu- 
facturing Course, class of 1925 wish to extend the best wishes to 
the undergraduates for the continuation of their school career and 
the best of luck in their respective duties thereafter. 

Adios 

General Cotton '25. 



PAGE TWENTY EIGHT 



®lje Reamer 



"Cljmt" Class ^tstor^ 



In the fall of nineteen twenty-three nine modern Ponce de 
Eeons in the guest of the fountain of knowledge entered the portals 
of the Bradford Durfee Textile School, and under her guidance 
have successfully arrived at their destination. 

These ambitious youths made up the famous "chem" class 
which will be graduated this year. 

Fired to a white heat with high ideals its members came from 
the four corners of New England and placed their names upon the 
school register. In the laboratory they began the struggle for a 
thorough knowledge of the principles of Chemistry and dyeing. 

Once the bond of fellowship had been formed the class was 
inseparable and proceeded to uphold its standards against all 
onslaughts, attaining a reputation immediately which stood out 
(like "Red's" hair) for the ensuing two years. 

What the entire class knew about chemistry at that early date 
wouldn't cover a flea's handkerchief. What each member now 
knows would fill many a volume, thanks to the diligent work of 
his highness, "The Stirring Rod." 

To relate all the events which took place during the two years 
at Textile would be an impossibility but no history would be 
complete without mentioning the following incidents : 

"Arsenic's" request as to who Ethyl Alcohol was and if he 
could make a date with her. 

"Andy's" desire to wield the hammer that would "crack" 
the oil in gas making. 

"Pitu's" impression that he had joined the army when told 
to "fire" the "bomb" in the caliometer, 

Much to the sorrow of his classmates a very popular member 
of the class, David "Shorty" Palmer, having obtained a position 
during the latter part of the second year, severed connections with 



PAGE TWENTY-NINE 



®ljs ^tnmtx 



the school. Although small in stature he has mastered many diffi- 
cult "propositions" notably. "Arsenic Bill Cromie." 

Another unforgetable incident occurred, when "Jake" threw 
a beaker of water at "Arsenic" and the latter returned the compli- 
ments but his beaker didn't contain Water ! 

"Pitu's" very "special" mixture of Beechnut chewing 
tobacco and rubber will have a lasting impression with some 
members of the class. 

Joy must give way to sadness as we leave those friends and 
classmates who have endeared themselves to us at good old Durfee 
Textile but let us hope for success to the chemists of 1925 and we 
trust that we shall soon meet again. 



PAGE THIRTY 



^[\\t Reamer 

Principal 
Henry W. Nichols, A. B. 

Assistant Principal 
William E. Drake, B. S. 

Cotton Yarn Prkparation Department 
William A. Goss 

Assistant 
Harold C. Smith 

Warp Preparation and Weaving Departments 

John W. Norman 

Assistant 
Thomas Jones 

Engineering Department 
William E. Drake, B. S. 

Assistants 
Mechanical Drawing Machine Shop 

Edward V. Carroll, B. S. John J. Crawford 

Chemistry and Dyeing Departments 
C. Nelson Alderman 

Assistants 
James Worton, B. S. Bernard S. Hillman 

Freehand Drawing Department 
Eucien Schimpf 

Head of Extension Work 
William H. Broomhead 

Margaret E. Morgan, Bursar Gertrude F. Horan, Register 

John J. Munroe, Engineer 



PAGE THIRTY-THREE 



tEije J&znmtx 



J&x&t of piumers of ^ebal, J^rfyolarslitps nnb ?$x\z£& 



(Eerttf icafas ( J9 ay) 

Anna Elizabeth Hansen, Freehand Drawing and Painting 
Walter Hardman, Chemistry and Dyeing 

John J. Harrington, Mechanical Drawing and Machine Shop 
John E. E. Hearne, Mechanical Drawing and Machine Shop 
Doris Barbara Hosking, Freehand Drawing and Painting 
Charles J. Meagher, Carding, Spinning and Dyeing 

^^bal J^ftrarbeb By ^National JVssortaitmt of (Uorton (iflftaimfactur^rs 
Benjamin W. Heath 1922-1923 
Bradford D. Grant 1923-1924 



Elmer N. Hopewell 
Robert E. Cooper 
Robert E. Cooper 

Harold Cochrane 
George E. Mills 
George E. Mills 

George S. Monroe 
George S. Monroe 

James J. McArdle 

James E. Giblin 
James E. Giblin 



Yue Hen Sun 
Clifford T. Friar 
George S. Monroe 

Bradford D. Grant 
Harold Meyer 
Charles Eubinsky 
Thomas Gracia 



J§>cl]0larsl]tps 

1922-1923 Earle P. Charlton, Jr. 
1923-1924 Earle P. Charlton, Jr. 
1924-1925 Earle P. Charlton, Jr. 

1922-1923 Frank S. Stevens 
1923-1924 Frank S. Stevens 
1924-1925 Frank S. Stevens 

1923-1924 Mass. Charitable Mechanics 

Association 

1924-1925 Mass. Charitable Mechanics 

Association 

1924-1925 Textile Colorist 

1923-1924 Rotary Club 
1924-1925 Rotary Club 



IXIZS& 



1922-1923 
1922-1923 
1922-1923 

1923-1924 
1923-1924 
1923-1924 
1923-1924 



Edmond Cote 
Edmond Cote- 
Edmond Cote- 

Edmond Cote- 
Edmond Cote- 
Edmond Cote- 
Edmond Cote- 



— jacquard 
—gingham 
—yearly rating 

—jacquard 
— 20har.dobby 
-gingham 
-yearly rating 



PAGE THIRTY-FOUR 



®{je Jlgamer 




Athletic Association 



D. Bernard Golding, 
William Masterson, 
William Cromie, 

Managers 
Harold Keresy — Baseball 
James McArdle — Basketball 

Coach 



'25 President 

'26 Vice President 

'25 Secretary 

Captains 
Harold Dean 
William Cromie 



James Worton 
Advisory Board 

D. Bernard Golding, Chairman William Cromie, Secretary 

A. Linwood Brassell, Student Advisor 

C. Nelson Alderman, Faculty Advisor 

Edward Carroll, Faculty Treasurer 

The Student Body elected to the Advisory Board a group 

of conscientious men, capable of passing judgment on matters of 

athletics and entertainment. 

Meetings were held every other week throughout the school 
year at which they sanctioned the purchase of uniforms and 
supplies, discussed the schedules, and arranged the finances of 
the basketball and baseball teams. 

Under the auspices of the Athletic Association two socials 
were held. Both proved to be financially successful and added 
much to the entertainment of the students and their friends. 

The banner was purchased for the benefit of the school and 
it now adorns the front wall of the Assembly Hall. 

The Advisory Board has closed the most successful year, 
attaining a standard for future Boards to strive for. Its accom- 
plishments will stand as a monument to the inexhaustible 
interest of the members. 

Wrarkrs of the k ' T " 
Basketball 
Clarence Bevans 
Randolph MacBeath 
Joseph Magnino 

Baseball 
James Connors 
Francis E. Griffin 
Joseph Magnino 
Walter Marston 



Robert Bannister 
James McArdle 



William Cromie 
Arthur McCann 



Gordon Andrew 
Thomas Gracia 
Harold Keresey 
William Masterson 



Harold Dean 
Alvin Hoar 
Arthur McCann 
David Posnak 



PAGE THIRTY-FIVE 



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PAGE THIRTY-SIX 



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^asehail '25 

Captain — Harold Dean Manager — Harold Keresey 

Assistant Manager — Alvin Hoar 

Coach — James Worton 

The baseball team, with Mr. Worton as coach, held its first 
practise at North Park with about thirty-five candidates on deck. 
Although they had neither bat nor ball in their hands for 
over a year their appearance was very promising. 

There is plenty of material for the coach to pick from and 
the competition will be very keen. The weakest spots in the 
team will be fought for by new men who show great promise. 
Andrew and Magnino are in line for catching position. Hoar, 
Dean, Marston and Keresey are expected to twirl the pellet 
through the season. Posnak will take care of short and 
Masterson will most likely cover the keystone sack. The other 
positions are undecided, the most likely candidates being 
Keresey, McCanu, Griffin, Gracia and Connors. 

With such a wealth of valuable material, Textile is sure to 
stage a come-back and get sweet revenge for some of the defeats 
handed out to them last year. 

The schedule arranged b}' Manager Keresey is as follows : 

April 16 Dean Academy at Franklin 

" 18 LaSalle Academy at Fall River 

11 21 L,aSalle Academy at Providence 

" 23 Holy Family at New Bedford 

" 25 New Bedford Textile at New Bedford 

" 29 Powder Point at Duxbury 

May 2 Attleboro at Attleboro 

6 New Bedford Textile at Fall River 

9 Open 

" 13 St. George's at Newport 

' k 16 Holy Family at Fall River 

" 18 Northeastern at Providence 

" 20 Open 



PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN 



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PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT 



"(ILlje Reamer 



BASKETBALL 

William O. Cromie, Captain James McArdle, Manager 

Walter Marston, Assistant Manager 

James Worton, Coach 

Coach Worton issued the call for candidates on October 28th. 
The veterans who turned out were Cromie, Beans, McArdle and 
two subs of '24, Crowley and Keresey. MacBeath, Bannister, 
McCann, Magnino, Lahan, Connors, Harrington, Marston, 
Lynch, and Kelly were the new men. 

The team was handicapped by a series of unusual accidents 
at the start of the season. After some of the difficulties were 
overcome, Coach Worton succeeded in obtaining one of the best 
teams that ever represented B. D. T. S. 

The season started off with a bang by defeating the Bristol 
Aggies. Our next opponent was Rogers High, New England 
champions of '24. Th : s contest ended in defeat. An oppor- 
tunity to play this tean a return game on our own floor never 
materialized. In our first home game we took the fast Delphi 
five into camp, although, they later avenged this defeat. The 
next game was played during the Christinas vacation when some 
of the players were at home, consequently the game was lost. 
Our next two games. Brown Freshmen and dishing Academy 
were defeats for us by very narrow margins. This proved the 
turning point of the team's fortunes ; West Warwick was de- 
feated and then in the most important game of the year we 
avenged the defeat in New Bedford overcoming our greatest 
rival, New Bedford Textile. In the three following contests we 
returned the victors over St. George's, Providence Night College 
and General Electric. 

The school spirit which had been very good, was now at 
it's height for the Lowell game. A bus was chartered by the 
students to accompany the team to Lowell. In one of the best 
exhibitions of basketball ever given in that city, our boys were 
defeated by two points. ik A defeat, but an honor lo do so well." 



PAGE THIRTY-NINE 



©he ^Beamsr 



By this time the fighting instinct of the graduates of 
B. D. T. S. was astir and as a result the Alumni challenged us. 
To prove the team of '25 was the best ever produced at " Tex,' 
we accepted and came out far ahead. This ended the season 
for Textile. Captain Cromie and McArdle played their last 
game as they graduate in May. 

The men to whom letters were awarded are : Captain 
Cromie, Bannister, MacBeath, McCann, Bevans, Magnino, 
McArdle. 

Much credit is due Coach Worton for his untiring efforts 
and fine coaching. 









\ 




Summary of Skason 










Games 


won — 8 Games lost — 8 




B. 


D. 


T. 


S. 


28 


Bristol County Agricultural School 


12 


B. 


D. 


T. 


S. 


11 


Rogers High 


34 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


19 


New Bedford Textile 


42 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


35 


Delphi's 


27 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


11 


New Bedford Vocational 


31 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


19 


Brown Freshman 


37 


B. 


D 


T. 


s. 


18 


Delphi's 


29 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


18 


Cushing Academy 


24 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


28 


West Warwick 


20 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


31 


New Bedford Textile 


26 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


22 


Brown Junior Varsity 


33 


B. 


D 


T. 


s. 


25 


St. George's Prep. 


22 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


33 


Providence Night College 


17 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


39 


Lynn General Electric 


12 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


21 


Lowell Textile 


23 


B. 


D. 


T. 


s. 


52 


Alumni 


20 



Individual scoring: MacBeath 146, Bannister 106, Bevans 63, 
Magnino 56, McCann 25, Captain Cromie 8, Lahan 6, McArdle 3, 
Connors 1. 



PAGE FORTY 



®{j£ ^tnxxxtx 



To the Class of 1925 

Dear Graduates: 

The B. D. T. S. A. A. is open for membership 
to anyone who has completed a regular or special 
course at the school. Each and every man who has 
attended our school is urged to become a member 
and help us in building a powerful and active asso- 
ciation. 

After graduation if a student has no point of con- 
tact with his classmates he drifts apart from them. 
He loses many of the social and business contacts that 
are obtained from meeting his fellow graduates. He 
loses the good comradeship that has been enjoyed 
while in school and loses all interest in the school 
activities. 

The Alumni Association was formed to keep the 
graduates of the school in touch with their fellows 
and with the school. 

The Annual Banquet and Reunion offers an op- 
poitunity to renew our acquaintances and friendships 
of school days and when possible lend a helping hand 
to one another. 

The very purpose of this organization will be 
defeated if all the graduates do not join our or- 
ganization. 

Therefore, let me again urge you to enroll at 
once in our association and attend regularly our 
Annual Reunion and Banquet. 

Very truly yours, 

Harold Cockrane, 

President. 



PAGE FORTY-ONE 



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PAGE FORTY-TWO 



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Alpha — Philadelphia Textile School 

Beta — New Bedford Textile School 

Gamma — Lowell Textile School 

Delta— Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River, Mass. 

Eta — No. Carolina State College, Raleigh, N. C. 

Theta — Georgia School of Technology, Atlanta Ga. 

JMumm (Efyapier JEall 

Boston Chicago Northern New Jersey 

New York Providence Fall River 

Philadelphia Utica 

Beita Chapter 

President — Robert K. Cooper 

Vice President — A. I^inwood Brassell 

Secretary — Francis X. Campion 

Treasurer — Gordon P. Andrew 



James L,. Giblin 
George L. Mills 
Sherman Monroe 
Harold Dean 
Eugene Flanagan 
Kenneth Crowley 
William Cromie 

C. Nelson Alderman 
Frederick B. Hays 



JVcife ^embers 

David P. Palmer 
Alvin Hoar 
Charles Meagher 
Frank Fyans 
James McArdle 
Alvaris Drew 
Thomas Gracia 

Jfiaculig ^emtrers 

Henry W. Nichols 
Lueien Schimpf 



William Masterson 
Theodore Deane 
Randolph MacBeath 
Arthur McCann 
James Connor 
Joseph Magnino 
Harold Keresey 



John W. Norman 
William K. Drake 



William H. Broomhead 



Phi Psi is a national fraternity with six active and eight 
alumni chapters and is the largest textile fraternity in the world. 
It was founded in Philadelphia, Penn., on March 18, 1903, with 
five members. At the present time the membership of Phi Psi 
Fraternity is over a thousand. Delta Chapter was organized at 
the Bradford Durfee Textile School, Fall River, Mass., in 1909. 

At the start of the school year Delta Chapter held its annual 
smoker with the freshman at the school as guests, giving the 
new men an opportunity to become acquainted with the upper 
classmen. During the year three socials were run with much 
success, especially the Hallowe'en Party in the New Boston- 
Road Club House. Many alumni, with their wives and sweet- 
hearts joined the boys in having a good time. 

More power to the Alumni. 



PAGE FORTY-THREE 



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SIGMA PHI TAU FRATERNITY 

Ivubinsky, Hillman, Posnak, Golding 

Boxser, Hayman, I/Ovit 



PAGE FORTY-FOUR 



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Incorporated 1917 
Organized 1910 Established Fall River 1925 

^cttfo Adapter ^RolX 

Alpha — Philadelphia Textile School 

Beta — New Bedford Textile School 

Gamma — Bradford Durfee Textile School 

(Alumni (Efyapier JRoII 
New York, Philadelphia 

Faculty Members 
Bernard Hillman 

Active Members 
Samuel L,ovit Dave Posnak 

Charles Lubinsky Charles Hayman 

Barney Golding I^ouis Boxser 

®ammu (ttljapter 

The "Sigma Phi Tau Fraternity," Gamma Chapter was 
organized and admitted on March 1, 1925. It consists of seven 
charter members; Charles M. Hayman, '26, D. Bernard Golding, 
'25, Charles IyUbinsky, '25, Bernard Hillman, Louis Boxser, 
'26, David Posnak, '26 and Samuel Ivpvit, '26. 

The first move towards a fraternal orginization was made 
in September, 1924, when the above men formed a club known 
as the ' Textile Brotherhood Club." This club was active until 
the charter that made them an organized chapter of one of the 
most prominent textile fraternities was received. 

On April 3, 4 and 5 three delegates from the newly organ- 
ized Chapter attended the Annual Convention held at 
Philadelphia, Pa. and it proved to be one of the most successful 
ever held. 

The following men were officers for the year 1925 : Mr. 
Golding — Councilor, Mr. Hayman — Scribe, and Mr. IyUbinsky — 
Exchequer. The officers for the year 1925-26 are: Mr. Hayman 
— Councilor, Mr. Boxser — Scribe, and Mr. L,ovit — Exchequer. 

The purpose of this Chapter is to promote sincere fellowship 
among the students of the Bradford Durfee Textile School anr" 
to promote Textile and kindred interests among our men he 

PAGE FORTY-FIVE 



®lj£ Reamer 



Phamous Phaculty Phrases 



What say ? 

Me and my brother Arthur. 

Steady there. 

Ouward and Bullor. 

Substitutents. 

Look in the sheets. 

You'll get that later. 

I'm not getting up in the way of a speech fellows. 

You act like a bunch of kids. 

Sell that whistle. 

Put those things away, children. 

Bring your wulers and wasers to class. 

Step on the gas, gents. 

Cut that out. 

When I was overseer in . 

ou must go to Taunton before you get to Boston. 
Push the designs, gents. 
I'll be there. 



PAGE FORTY-SIX 



?Hlj£ Reamer 



Happenings to Remember 



That day Cooper tried to dye a woolen skein. 

Intermission at the school dances. 

The Christmas assembly in 1922. 

Our first day with Mr. Schimpf. 

The East Greenwich Basketball game. 

Who threw the bag of water ? 

The Dean Academy baseball game. 

The trip to Lowell. 

The initiation of Phi Psi men— 1924. 

The rocking boat to " Philly." 

The first rehearsal of the Glee Club. 

The Phi Psi Frat. House. 

The trip to Boston — Textile Exposition — 1^23, 

Weaving class room with Mr. Norman. 



PAGE FORTY-SEVEN 



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WIS WIFE: "GET OUT AMD PUSH AL6Y; 
IT'S TOO MUCH FOR OT1E OOMKEY.v 




PAGE FORTY-NINE 



^{\t ^samer 



Station H-O-T 

Signor Hali Tosis will now sing 

"The Breath of Morn" from "Listerine" 

He — Don't you love this Dance? 
She — Wait'll we start home. 

Waterman announces the successful drilling of another ink well. 

What would a nation be without women ? 
A stagnation, I guess. 

Harry — I just adore the way your roommate dresses. 
Mary — Oh! Has she been leaving her shades up again? 

Mandy — Mose is yo sho yo didn't marry me fo tnah job? 
Mose — Cos Ah didn't gal. Lawsy, no! yo jes go ahead and 
keep yo ol job. 

Little smells of cigarettes 

Little smells of gin, 
Tell a watchful chaperon 

Where the girls 've been. 

City Lady — What's that awful odor. 
Rube — Why that's fertilizer. 
City Lady — For land's sake! 
Rube — Yes ma'am. 

She — Have you heard of the new style of women's hose? 

He — I can't say I have, explain. 

She — Every girl has her full name embroidered on her stockings, 

the first name on the top and the last name below. 
He — But why the first name at the top? 
She — Oh, I 'spose that's so a person would have to know her 

quite well to call her by her first name. 

Many an autoist has a wonderful time with a miss in his motor. 

Dave — You say the new chorus has pretty legs? 
Jim — Yes, I can speak very highly of them. 

If a good woman is pure gold, a bad women must be pure guilt. 



PAGE FIFTY 



®lte ^earner 



Mr. Goss says some students remind him of a three letter word 
meaning squirrel food. 

Last week the absent-minded business man coming home, sur- 
prised his wife by kissing her. She was still puzzling 
when he mumbled, "Now I want to dictate a couple of 
letters." 

Yours till they prohibit gasoline to save the girls. 

Charles Lubinsky lies here in the ground, 
Don't jingle money while walking around. 

As the lifeguard said at the beach, "There's very little going on 
around here." 

"I can't get this through my head," said the would-be-suicide 
as the bullet missed the third time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Smith had been invited to a friends for tea and 
the time had arrived for preparing for the visit. "Come 
along dearie," said Mrs. Smith to her three old son, 
"and have your face washed;" "Don't want to be 
washed," came the reply. "But," said mother, "you 
don't want to be a dirty boy, do you? I want my little 
boy to have a nice clean face for the ladies to kiss." 
Upon this persuasion he gave way and was washed. A 
few minutes later he stood watching his father washing. 
"Ha, ha daddy," he cried, "I know why you're 
washing." 

Wife — George, is that you? 

George — Why certainly! Who else you 'specting at this 

timernight. 

She — What do you mean by kissing me? What do you mean? 
He — Er-er, nothing. 

She — Then don't you dare do it again. I won't have any man 
kissing me unless he means business, d'ye hear? 

L,ady in Box — Can you look over my shoulder? 
Sailor — I've been looking over both of them and by gosh they're 
great. 

PAGE FIFTY-ONE 



®ije ^enmtt 



" Wot was the last card Oi Dealt ye Moike ?" 

" A spade." 

' • Oi knew it, Oi saw ye spit on yer hands before ye picked it up. " 

Customer to palmist — Five dollars fee-er-would you have any 
objection to waiting until I get some of the money you 
say is coming to me ? 

The sweet young thing was being shown thru the boiler shop. 

"What is that thing?" she asked pointing with a dainty parasol. 

" That's an engine boiler," said the guide. 

11 And why do they boil engines," she inquires. 

11 To make the engine tender," replied the resourceful guide. 

The sergearn: rebuked the private angrily. 

" Monroe why aren't you shaved this morning ?" 

"Why! Ain't I shaved?" the private exclaimed apparently 

greatly surprised. 
"No you're not," replied the sergeant, " and I want to know 

the reason why." 
"Well now I guess it must be this way," Monroe suggested, 

ik There was a dozen of us usin the same bit of lookin 

glass, an I swan I must have shaved somebody else." 

Mistress — O, cook, be sure and put plenty of nuts in the cake. 
Cook — You don't catch me cracking no more nuts to-day. I've 
nearly broke me jaw already. 

On Johnnie's return from the birthday party, his mother ex- 
pressed the hope that he had behaved politely at the 
luncheon table and properly said, "Yes, if you please" 
and ' No, thank you," when anything was offered him. 

Johnnie shook his head seriously. " I guess I didn't say, No, 
thank you. I ate everything there was." 

Tommy Atkins anH a doughboy sat in a poker game together 
somewhere in France. The Britisher held a full house, 
the American four of a kind. "I raise you two 
pounds," quote Tommy. 

The Yankee did not hesitate. "I ain't exactly onto your cur- 
rency curves, but I'll bump it up four tons." 

PAGE FIFTY-TWO 



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PAGE FIFTY-THREE 



®{j£ JBeamer 



K-A Electrical Warp Stop for Looms 



The Warp Stop with a twenty year record of highest 
efficiency and accellerated growth. 

The K-A Electrical Warp Stop is a superior "motion" 
because it is electrical. 

It does not depend upon continuously agitated mech- 
anism in functioning. 

It acts with unequal promptness when a drop wire 
falls — and only then. 

It reduces the amount of fixing. 

It increases production by minimizing loom stoppage 
due to "warp stop" repair and adjustment. 

It is the most readily adaptable to varying conditions. 

That is why we are increasing our facilities. 

That is why every mill man should learn facts concern- 
ing our K-A Electrical. 



For K-A Facts Inquire 

Rhode Island Warp Stop Equipment Co. 

Pawtucket, Rhode Island 

PACE FIFTY-FOUR 



®I|e Reamer 




J: EC; 




Compliments of 


Compliments of 


T>elta Chapter 


Qamma Chapter 


of 


of 


'Phi <Psi Fraternity 


Sigma 'Phi ^au 




Fraternity 

i 



PAGE FIFTY-FIVE 



tSIhe ^Qenmtx 



Fall River's Department Food Store 

By modern equipment and methods, our Fall River store 
combines all these in one complete department food store, with 
all that is best in quality and service. Ten complete lines of 
merchandise under single management and backed by sound 
conservative policies. 



Cobb, Bates ck Yerxa Co. 

%ight Goods at %ight "Prices 



Telephone 1 570 



Free Delivery 



REILLY 


• 




Compliments of 


The 






Robert W. Powers 


Printer 









PAGE FIFTY-SIX 



^l[\t P^mw 



Compliments of 

Mayor 
EDMOND P. TALBOT 



PAGE FIFTY-SEVEN 



tElje Reamer 



EESONA 

REG, U. S. PAT. OFF^ 



Investigate the 

Advantages of Universal 

Wound Filling Yarn 



WE ask you to give careful consideration to 
the several advantages of using filling yarn 
prepared for weaving by Universal Winding. 
The economical manufacturing process of winding 
filling was introduced only after a long period of 
experiments and perfecting had overcome every ob- 
jection to its use, and established it as a paying 
investment. 

Cloth mills, producing almost every type of fabric, 
have found this preparatory process of undisputed 
value, and willingly admit that it has exceeded the 
greatest expectations. 

We asl: you to study this process, that you will be 
familiar with its advantages and economies, and in a 
position tc ^commend its use in your future textile 
career. 



UNI v \L WINDING COMPANY 

Provide ' yd tts o TflAT Philadelphia. 

iwv BOSTON Charlotte. 

Chicago Montreal and Hamilton, Canada Utica. 

Depots and Offices at Manchester and Paris 



SMWi i mmimassmmmm — ■ 



PAGE FIFTY-EIGHT 



tElje ^tnmtt 



One Plant, 

One Management! 



Since the inception of this concern, in 1831, nearly one 
hundred years ago, the shop, as it is known to those who are in 
any way connected with it, and the management have been as one. 

Since the day the first Whitin picker was built there has 
been a sense of loyalty between employer and employee, the one 
to the other, which has been and is reflected in the quality and 
workmanship of all that has been produced by this plant. 

Today, on the basis of the severe modern competition, these 
two attributes stand all in good stead. 

Due to being a self-contained unit under one roof more care- 
ful supervision over design and more uniformity and consistency 
in manufacture is had than is possible in a plant of several 
separate units. And for the same reason, by the co-ope/ation 
engendered thereby, the words " WHITIN" and "QUALITY" 
are synonymous. 

Visitors are cordially invited at all times. 



WHITIN MACHINE V'OPKS 

TEXTILE MACHINERY MANUFACTL 
WHITINSVILLE, MASS. 

Charlotte, N. C. Atlanta, Ga. 



PAGE FIFTY-NINE 



®ff* ^ 



e&xnzv 



Compliments of 

Third Year General Cotton Class 



ESTABLISHED 1842 H. B. WETHERELL, Treasurer 

O. B, Wether ell & Son Co. 

Manufacturing 

Roller Coverers 

Sixth Street Fall Tliver 



PAGE SIXTY 



tftfye Reamer 



Automatic Terry Towel Loom 




Built for Under Cam, Jacquard 
or Dobby Harness Motion 



"A Loom for Every Known Woven Fabric" 

Crompton & Knowles Loom Works 
worcester, mass. 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. PHILADELPHIA, PA. PATERSON, N. J. 



PAGE SIXTY-ONE 



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Borden & Remington Co. 



BOREMGi 



Textile Finishers' Supplies 



Manufacturers of 

{Tforemco 

Paints, 

Garnishes 

and Stains 



For the Interior of Buildings 

BOREMCO FLAT WALL PAINT 

A beautiful sanitary paint for walls and 
ceilings 

BOREMCO MILL WHITE 

An extremely white and enduring paint foi 

the interior of factories and industrial 

plants, etc. 

EXTRA-LITE 

A snow white oil enamel paint, drying with 

a high gloss, for the highest grade 

of interior work 



Salesroom, 748 Pleasant Street 
Factory, 1 15 A lawan Street Telephone 6020 



C. K. Grouse Co. 



No. Attleboro, Mass. 



School and College Jewelry 



PAGE SIXTY-TWO 



tElje Reamer 



The Stafford Company 

Manufacturers of Weaving Machinery 



Stafford Automatic Looms 

For Weaving all manner of textile fabrics, plain and fancy, 
course or fine. Stafford Looms can be supplied with either 
shuttle or bobbin changing automatic features. 



Dobbies, Box Motions, 
Fancy Weaving Motions 



The Stafford Company 

READVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 

Southern Agent Canadian Agents 

Fred H. White, Charlotte, N. C. Whitehead, Emmans, Ltd., Montreal, P. Q. 



PAGE SIXTY-TMRIIE 



_. Qgte , 

Date Loaned 




-— _ 




, 






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